Breathing in colors

Words

Having been born in the 80s, before computers were a mainstay in every home, I grew up with the typewriter. My dad bought us one for school: a heavy, 4-kilo typewriter with a carrying case that weighed nearly as much as the device it held. It definitely wasn’t compact, nor was it built to be lugged around. It was heavy. But the feeling of tactile feedback, of fingers getting stuck in between keys, and the clacking sounds the typewriter makes each time a letter is typed out—those, I believed, were the sound and feel of writing.

So when I finally got a hold of a computer, I thought that writing with it would be much more exciting. After all, it had features not available on a typewriter: unlimited undo options and revision possibilities to name a few. But surprisingly enough, once I tried it out for myself, I didn’t find it as exciting or revolutionary as I thought I would. The blank page on a lit screen didn’t inspire me at all. There was no excitement in typing with a slow computer via Basic. As much as it was convenient (and compared to its predecessor, it really was) I found writing with computers actually unappealing. Until my senior year in high school (1998), I continued to write with a typewriter—even working on my 50-page thesis with it.

When I got into college, the need for computers became more apparent to me. As a budding artist, I needed to learn Photoshop to be able to advance in my craft. And that meant also meant having to write with a computer, as well. Or perhaps, more specifically, Microsoft Word.

It was the only tool being used in school; our professor only entertained papers, essays, and homework that were saved as .doc files. Again, it did feel liberating at times, being able to undo a mistake with ease, not having to spend for wasted paper and typewriter ribbons, and even choose from a wide selection of fonts to showcase my work with. So roll with times I went, writing with my 15-inch screen, staring at a blank document, pouring out the words character after character.

After some time, I began to realize that I hated MS Word. It was tedious; not only did it used to take around three minutes just to open a blank sheet of paper, it even interrupted my actual writing by making me worry about which font to use, screaming out my errors with red lines, and having Clippy pop up every five minutes. At around the same time I decided that MS Word was just not the tool for writing, I found my zen with WordPad.

Sometime after, I eventually switched from a PC to a Mac. Now this meant I had to switch from WordPad to something else, too—and I was glad I found TextEdit to fill the void. I found a new friend in TextEdit; it fulfilled my needs just right. My only gripe with it, I found when I became an art director for an ad agency; most of the copywriters at work use MS Word, and opening a .doc file on TextEdit just isn’t done. There are times when some words disappear or formatting goes awry, and I end up missing necessary details. So MS Office, the computer tool I started writing with, is now of no use to me save to open the .doc files I need. Actually, if you ask me to write a document right now, I’d rather fire up my Adobe Illustrator (or what used to be Macromedia Freehand), then save it as a PDF file.

It is actually surprising for a designer like me to be particular with my writing apps. On my Mac, I have TextEdit, Pages, NValt, Mou, iAWriter, Evernote, Marked, Day One, Ommwriter and Ulysses III. On my iPhone and iPad, I have iAWriter, Writing Kit, Textastic, Nebulous Note, Simplenote, WriteRoom,Evernote, Drafts, Daedalus Touch, and Editorial. What’s even more surprising is that I use all of them—and none of them have earned the grumble I had for MS Word. 1

Thinking about my experience with MS Word and its inconvenience, I realized that app shouldn’t get in the way of writing. Instead, they should help us focus and turn our inspiration into writing, not bog us down with font selection, formatting, style, and pagination. I understand that there are people who are comfortable working with MS Word; it remains to be their main tool for paperwork, legal documents, letterheads, etc. What I don’t get is how writers are able to settle with that for creative writing. There just are so many tools out there that can serve you well so you don’t have to put up with MS Word’s bloated features.

MS Word is an app created for the print world. Where letter-sized paper still matters and printing is the default output of your work. But think about it: we may now live in the digital age, but it feels like we’re still stuck with antiquated tools. It feels like MS Word wants us to stay stuck with its old ways, when, really, all we should be doing is moving forward with our writing.

Writers have to take control of their writing now. In fact, with the many alternatives out there, they are more than able to. Pick one app or tool and forget about the world. Start writing. No need to get stuck with MS Word.

The idea for this post was written first on Simplenote on my iPhone, 1st Draft was written on Daedalus Touch on the iPhone/iPad, 2nd draft on Editorial for iPad and final output/markdown on Ulysses III.



By the time I publish this, I added two more writing apps on my iPad (Terminology & Phraseology). ↩

Words

Having been born in the 80s, before computers were a mainstay in every home, I grew up with the typewriter. My dad bought us one for school: a heavy, 4-kilo typewriter with a carrying case that weighed nearly as much as the device it held. It definitely wasn’t compact, nor was it built to be lugged around. It was heavy. But the feeling of tactile feedback, of fingers getting stuck in between keys, and the clacking sounds the typewriter makes each time a letter is typed out—those, I believed, were the sound and feel of writing.

So when I finally got a hold of a computer, I thought that writing with it would be much more exciting. After all, it had features not available on a typewriter: unlimited undo options and revision possibilities to name a few. But surprisingly enough, once I tried it out for myself, I didn’t find it as exciting or revolutionary as I thought I would. The blank page on a lit screen didn’t inspire me at all. There was no excitement in typing with a slow computer via Basic. As much as it was convenient (and compared to its predecessor, it really was) I found writing with computers actually unappealing. Until my senior year in high school (1998), I continued to write with a typewriter—even working on my 50-page thesis with it.

When I got into college, the need for computers became more apparent to me. As a budding artist, I needed to learn Photoshop to be able to advance in my craft. And that meant also meant having to write with a computer, as well. Or perhaps, more specifically, Microsoft Word.

It was the only tool being used in school; our professor only entertained papers, essays, and homework that were saved as .doc files. Again, it did feel liberating at times, being able to undo a mistake with ease, not having to spend for wasted paper and typewriter ribbons, and even choose from a wide selection of fonts to showcase my work with. So roll with times I went, writing with my 15-inch screen, staring at a blank document, pouring out the words character after character.

After some time, I began to realize that I hated MS Word. It was tedious; not only did it used to take around three minutes just to open a blank sheet of paper, it even interrupted my actual writing by making me worry about which font to use, screaming out my errors with red lines, and having Clippy pop up every five minutes. At around the same time I decided that MS Word was just not the tool for writing, I found my zen with WordPad.

Sometime after, I eventually switched from a PC to a Mac. Now this meant I had to switch from WordPad to something else, too—and I was glad I found TextEdit to fill the void. I found a new friend in TextEdit; it fulfilled my needs just right. My only gripe with it, I found when I became an art director for an ad agency; most of the copywriters at work use MS Word, and opening a .doc file on TextEdit just isn’t done. There are times when some words disappear or formatting goes awry, and I end up missing necessary details. So MS Office, the computer tool I started writing with, is now of no use to me save to open the .doc files I need. Actually, if you ask me to write a document right now, I’d rather fire up my Adobe Illustrator (or what used to be Macromedia Freehand), then save it as a PDF file.

It is actually surprising for a designer like me to be particular with my writing apps. On my Mac, I have TextEdit, Pages, NValt, Mou, iAWriter, Evernote, Marked, Day One, Ommwriter and Ulysses III. On my iPhone and iPad, I have iAWriter, Writing Kit, Textastic, Nebulous Note, Simplenote, WriteRoom,Evernote, Drafts, Daedalus Touch, and Editorial. What’s even more surprising is that I use all of them—and none of them have earned the grumble I had for MS Word. 1

Thinking about my experience with MS Word and its inconvenience, I realized that app shouldn’t get in the way of writing. Instead, they should help us focus and turn our inspiration into writing, not bog us down with font selection, formatting, style, and pagination. I understand that there are people who are comfortable working with MS Word; it remains to be their main tool for paperwork, legal documents, letterheads, etc. What I don’t get is how writers are able to settle with that for creative writing. There just are so many tools out there that can serve you well so you don’t have to put up with MS Word’s bloated features.

MS Word is an app created for the print world. Where letter-sized paper still matters and printing is the default output of your work. But think about it: we may now live in the digital age, but it feels like we’re still stuck with antiquated tools. It feels like MS Word wants us to stay stuck with its old ways, when, really, all we should be doing is moving forward with our writing.

Writers have to take control of their writing now. In fact, with the many alternatives out there, they are more than able to. Pick one app or tool and forget about the world. Start writing. No need to get stuck with MS Word.

The idea for this post was written first on Simplenote on my iPhone, 1st Draft was written on Daedalus Touch on the iPhone/iPad, 2nd draft on Editorial for iPad and final output/markdown on Ulysses III.


  1. By the time I publish this, I added two more writing apps on my iPad (Terminology & Phraseology). 

Comments
How to get Netflix in the Philippines

Netflix is an online video-on-demand (VOD) service that gives unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows.  Others out there are Hulu, HBOGo, and Crackle.

I have been happily using Netflix since August accessing via iPhone, iPad, Mac, AppleTV and PS3.  With thousands of content at my beck and call from indie films to popular TV shows and documentaries, I find no need to continue my cable subscription.

Netflix has been recently adding their own original content in the mix. With House of Cards winning multiple awards, it is hard to argue that the Netflix team are dead serious about producing their original content - especially now that the distributors are playing hard ball with them.

Netflix may be online but they don’t have distribution rights to all their  licensed content worldwide. This means all  access to these content are limited to just certain part of the world.  If you try accessing, it will tell you that “Netflix is not available in your country yet even if you borrow your relative’s Netflix US account.

You will also need  a US Credit Card to sign up a subscription as your local platinum card will not do.

How can one get Netflix access in the Philippines? I’ll run you through some pointers.

How to sign-up for Netflix service?  There are 2 ways:

Option 1:  VPN (Virtual Private Network)
The oldest method of all to spoof website of your location. VPN is a service that provides your computer or device a secure connection while also giving you an IP address of a different location other than your own (depends on which IP you choose). There are VPN services that allow you to choose and modify your IP address on the fly. Others only have a certain number of IP addresses on certain countries. I’ve used a couple of VPN services since August. So far, HMA is the best of the bunch.

To be able to access Netflix, you need to set your IP address to an IP address located in the US. It is best to choose an IP address where you want to access the content. If the content you want to access is locked in the US, then you need to choose an IP address from the US.  VPN is usually priced around $4.99 up to $9.99 a month depending on the service provider. Getting an annual subscription is way cheaper.

Pros:

Netflix content access from other countries just set your IP address to that country like UK
website and other services access that is available only to certain countries
can be used to get streaming services like Spotify, Rdio, Pandora, Crackle, Hulu, HBOGo, etc.
connection is transmitted securely and your IP is set on a different location
Cons:

hard to set-up; you need to manually connect every time you use it
since VPN needs to go through another server to secure your connection, your internet speed is affected as  your connection still has to go through another server before it goes to Netflix, then goes back to your VPN server before it gets transmitted back to you
VPN only works on a per-device level that supports VPN. You need a specialized/custom hardware that you can configure to connect with VPN. Most devices that connects with your TV such as PS3, Wii, AppleTV, Roku can’t be configured with a VPN so the only work around is to have a router that could.
Option 2:  DNS (Domain Name System)
I actually don’t know how DNS works but based on experience it’s actually better than using a VPN, IMHO. It’s easier to set-up and it is now my recommended method in accessing Netflix. For this method I signed up for PlaymoTV1. PlaymoTV lets you connect to various video/music streaming site. It’s easier to set-up, just sign up to the service and it will provide you with a DNS server that you can configure on your devices. Once set-up you don’t need to even manually connect like VPN does. You just need to restart your device and thats it. There is a 7-day trial on PlaymoTV so sign up if you want to try the service. Monthly subscription start at $4.99 and annual subscription is $49.99.

Pros:

easy to set-up than VPN
connection is faster and more focus on streaming content
cheaper than VPN
works on most home entertainment box and gaming console
access to most VOD/music streaming sites in the US
Cons:

not all US-only site/services is supported
you can only access Spotify on their website. It won’t work on the desktop app or mobile app

How to pay for Netflix service?
I’m lucky to have two sisters in the US that are both subscribed to Netflix.  Both are happy to provide me their account but to me, I still prefer to pay for services that I use. I don’t like piggybacking on others people’s account plus it also helps Netflix to keep afloat and pay their bills.

I only found one method to pay for Netflix (or other US-only service) and that is GCASH Amex Virtual Pay by Globe Telecom. GCASH Amex is mostly advertised for online shopping.  I was surprised it worked when I tried using it on US-only streaming sites to sign up for a trial.

Since I’m on Globe postpaid, I am also allowed to spend Php500 on top of my bill using GCASH Amex.  With that, I don’t need to transfer any money every month just to pay for my Netflix account since PhP500 ($11) is more than enough for Netflix basic subscription for $7.99 (PhP364.002) a month.

The Basic subscription lets you watch on two devices simultaneously. There’s also a family account that lets you use Netflix on four screens. Since both my sisters only pay for basic subscription, with kids in their respective homes, it’s just not right for me to use their accounts.

If you’re only planning to subscribe to numerous services other than Netflix, Hulu Plus, Crackle, etc and will only use it on your computer–I suggest you get a VPN account and just connect your computer to your TV. That way, you also have access to US-only web-content anywhere you go. But if you’re like me who wants to watch Netflix on numerous devices like PS3, Wii and AppleTV, the best way to go is PlaymoTV.
Update 1

Someone from Facebook pointed out that you can use a local credit card to pay for Netflix. I tried researching the method and it turns out that you just need to change your credit card’s ZIP code to a US zip code since Netflix doesn’t verify it. You may have a problem with your bank issuer if it doesn’t allow it as some user posted. Also another cheaper DNS is also available for only $1.99 a month called Adfreetime. I’ll check if this method is faster than the one I am currently using.

Update 2

I’ve tested my local credit card (HSBC) and it is working on Netflix and Hulu. I was able to sign up to both service by altering my Zip code to match a code from US. Also, got a report from another user that his Citibank credit card is also worked using this trick.

This post contains affiliate link to PlaymoTV. If you like my post and would like to sign up on PlaymoTV, please consider clicking my link. This blog is personal no affiliation whatsoever with Globe Telecom, Netflix, PlaymoTV 



This is an affiliate link. ↩



as of this writing ↩

How to get Netflix in the Philippines

Netflix is an online video-on-demand (VOD) service that gives unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows. Others out there are Hulu, HBOGo, and Crackle.

I have been happily using Netflix since August accessing via iPhone, iPad, Mac, AppleTV and PS3. With thousands of content at my beck and call from indie films to popular TV shows and documentaries, I find no need to continue my cable subscription.

Netflix has been recently adding their own original content in the mix. With House of Cards winning multiple awards, it is hard to argue that the Netflix team are dead serious about producing their original content - especially now that the distributors are playing hard ball with them.

Netflix may be online but they don’t have distribution rights to all their licensed content worldwide. This means all access to these content are limited to just certain part of the world. If you try accessing, it will tell you that “Netflix is not available in your country yet even if you borrow your relative’s Netflix US account.

You will also need a US Credit Card to sign up a subscription as your local platinum card will not do.

How can one get Netflix access in the Philippines? I’ll run you through some pointers.

  1. How to sign-up for Netflix service? There are 2 ways:

    Option 1: VPN (Virtual Private Network) The oldest method of all to spoof website of your location. VPN is a service that provides your computer or device a secure connection while also giving you an IP address of a different location other than your own (depends on which IP you choose). There are VPN services that allow you to choose and modify your IP address on the fly. Others only have a certain number of IP addresses on certain countries. I’ve used a couple of VPN services since August. So far, HMA is the best of the bunch.

    To be able to access Netflix, you need to set your IP address to an IP address located in the US. It is best to choose an IP address where you want to access the content. If the content you want to access is locked in the US, then you need to choose an IP address from the US. VPN is usually priced around $4.99 up to $9.99 a month depending on the service provider. Getting an annual subscription is way cheaper.

    Pros:

    • Netflix content access from other countries just set your IP address to that country like UK
    • website and other services access that is available only to certain countries
    • can be used to get streaming services like Spotify, Rdio, Pandora, Crackle, Hulu, HBOGo, etc.
    • connection is transmitted securely and your IP is set on a different location

    Cons:

    • hard to set-up; you need to manually connect every time you use it
    • since VPN needs to go through another server to secure your connection, your internet speed is affected as your connection still has to go through another server before it goes to Netflix, then goes back to your VPN server before it gets transmitted back to you
    • VPN only works on a per-device level that supports VPN. You need a specialized/custom hardware that you can configure to connect with VPN. Most devices that connects with your TV such as PS3, Wii, AppleTV, Roku can’t be configured with a VPN so the only work around is to have a router that could.

    Option 2: DNS (Domain Name System) I actually don’t know how DNS works but based on experience it’s actually better than using a VPN, IMHO. It’s easier to set-up and it is now my recommended method in accessing Netflix. For this method I signed up for PlaymoTV1. PlaymoTV lets you connect to various video/music streaming site. It’s easier to set-up, just sign up to the service and it will provide you with a DNS server that you can configure on your devices. Once set-up you don’t need to even manually connect like VPN does. You just need to restart your device and thats it. There is a 7-day trial on PlaymoTV so sign up if you want to try the service. Monthly subscription start at $4.99 and annual subscription is $49.99.

    Pros:

    • easy to set-up than VPN
    • connection is faster and more focus on streaming content
    • cheaper than VPN
    • works on most home entertainment box and gaming console
    • access to most VOD/music streaming sites in the US

    Cons:

    • not all US-only site/services is supported
    • you can only access Spotify on their website. It won’t work on the desktop app or mobile app
  2. How to pay for Netflix service?
    I’m lucky to have two sisters in the US that are both subscribed to Netflix. Both are happy to provide me their account but to me, I still prefer to pay for services that I use. I don’t like piggybacking on others people’s account plus it also helps Netflix to keep afloat and pay their bills.

    I only found one method to pay for Netflix (or other US-only service) and that is GCASH Amex Virtual Pay by Globe Telecom. GCASH Amex is mostly advertised for online shopping. I was surprised it worked when I tried using it on US-only streaming sites to sign up for a trial.

    Since I’m on Globe postpaid, I am also allowed to spend Php500 on top of my bill using GCASH Amex. With that, I don’t need to transfer any money every month just to pay for my Netflix account since PhP500 ($11) is more than enough for Netflix basic subscription for $7.99 (PhP364.002) a month.

    The Basic subscription lets you watch on two devices simultaneously. There’s also a family account that lets you use Netflix on four screens. Since both my sisters only pay for basic subscription, with kids in their respective homes, it’s just not right for me to use their accounts.

    If you’re only planning to subscribe to numerous services other than Netflix, Hulu Plus, Crackle, etc and will only use it on your computer–I suggest you get a VPN account and just connect your computer to your TV. That way, you also have access to US-only web-content anywhere you go. But if you’re like me who wants to watch Netflix on numerous devices like PS3, Wii and AppleTV, the best way to go is PlaymoTV.

Update 1

Someone from Facebook pointed out that you can use a local credit card to pay for Netflix. I tried researching the method and it turns out that you just need to change your credit card’s ZIP code to a US zip code since Netflix doesn’t verify it. You may have a problem with your bank issuer if it doesn’t allow it as some user posted. Also another cheaper DNS is also available for only $1.99 a month called Adfreetime. I’ll check if this method is faster than the one I am currently using.

Update 2

I’ve tested my local credit card (HSBC) and it is working on Netflix and Hulu. I was able to sign up to both service by altering my Zip code to match a code from US. Also, got a report from another user that his Citibank credit card is also worked using this trick.

This post contains affiliate link to PlaymoTV. If you like my post and would like to sign up on PlaymoTV, please consider clicking my link. This blog is personal no affiliation whatsoever with Globe Telecom, Netflix, PlaymoTV 


  1. This is an affiliate link. 

  2. as of this writing 

Comments
fiftythreenyc:

EVERY STORY HAS A NAME
FiftyThree’s story began with Paper. What began with three guys building an app out of a New York City apartment has gone on to become one of the most celebrated applications on iOS, defining mobile creativity and winning Apple’s 2012 iPad App of the Year. Paper embodied our belief that technology should support the human need to create. It’s a beautifully simple app that lets anyone capture their ideas and share them over the web. For millions of creators around the world, Paper is where they call home for their ideas—100 million, in fact, over the last two years. Paper has come to represent endless creative potential, and we couldn’t have asked for a better beginning to our story.
Stories have twists.
So it came as a surprise when we learned on January 30th with everyone else that Facebook was announcing an app with the same name—Paper. Not only were we confused but so were our customers (twitter) and press (1,2,3,4). Was this the same Paper? Nope. Had FiftyThree been acquired? Definitely not. Then, what’s going on?
We reached out to Facebook about the confusion their app was creating, and they apologized for not contacting us sooner. But an earnest apology should come with a remedy.
Stories reveal character. 
There’s a simple fix here. We think Facebook can apply the same degree of thought they put into the app into building a brand name of their own. An app about stories shouldn’t start with someone else’s story. Facebook should stop using our brand name.
On a personal level we have many ties to Facebook. Many friends, former students and colleagues are doing good work at Facebook. One of Facebook’s board members is an investor in FiftyThree. We’re a Facebook developer, and Paper supports sharing to Facebook where close to 500,000 original pages have been shared. Connections run deep.
What will Facebook’s story be? Will they be the corporate giant who bullies their developers? Or be agile, recognize a mistake, and fix it? Is it “Move fast and break things” or “Move fast and make things”?
We’re all storytellers. And we show care for each other by caring for our stories. Thanks for supporting us.
Georg PetschniggCo-Founder and CEOFiftyThree

Facebook has forgotten how it feels like to be a small company

fiftythreenyc:

EVERY STORY HAS A NAME

FiftyThree’s story began with Paper. What began with three guys building an app out of a New York City apartment has gone on to become one of the most celebrated applications on iOS, defining mobile creativity and winning Apple’s 2012 iPad App of the Year. Paper embodied our belief that technology should support the human need to create. It’s a beautifully simple app that lets anyone capture their ideas and share them over the web. For millions of creators around the world, Paper is where they call home for their ideas—100 million, in fact, over the last two years. Paper has come to represent endless creative potential, and we couldn’t have asked for a better beginning to our story.

Stories have twists.

So it came as a surprise when we learned on January 30th with everyone else that Facebook was announcing an app with the same name—Paper. Not only were we confused but so were our customers (twitter) and press (1,2,3,4). Was this the same Paper? Nope. Had FiftyThree been acquired? Definitely not. Then, what’s going on?

We reached out to Facebook about the confusion their app was creating, and they apologized for not contacting us sooner. But an earnest apology should come with a remedy.

Stories reveal character.

There’s a simple fix here. We think Facebook can apply the same degree of thought they put into the app into building a brand name of their own. An app about stories shouldn’t start with someone else’s story. Facebook should stop using our brand name.

On a personal level we have many ties to Facebook. Many friends, former students and colleagues are doing good work at Facebook. One of Facebook’s board members is an investor in FiftyThree. We’re a Facebook developer, and Paper supports sharing to Facebook where close to 500,000 original pages have been shared. Connections run deep.

What will Facebook’s story be? Will they be the corporate giant who bullies their developers? Or be agile, recognize a mistake, and fix it? Is it “Move fast and break things” or “Move fast and make things”?

We’re all storytellers. And we show care for each other by caring for our stories. Thanks for supporting us.

Georg Petschnigg
Co-Founder and CEO
FiftyThree

Facebook has forgotten how it feels like to be a small company

Comments
Since I wasn’t able to buy a physical copy today. I’m opting for the digital version and double dip when I find a copy. #SandmanOverture

you can buy the book thru Comixology.

Since I wasn’t able to buy a physical copy today. I’m opting for the digital version and double dip when I find a copy. #SandmanOverture

you can buy the book thru Comixology.

Comments
Don’t forget to greet Siri today!

Don’t forget to greet Siri today!

Comments
Anonymous asked:
Hi, my name is Josh Nelson. I recently started using Sketch and I'm having trouble using all the great UI kits. I'm used to working in Photoshop - dragging UI elements from one tab to another, etc. but it seems like the workflow is different in Sketch. Do you have any suggestion or videos/blogs you can refer me to regarding using UI kits? I really appreciate any help/direction/guidance you can give. Thanks!

wiredfractal
wiredfractal answered:

Hi Josh, First of all welcome to using Sketch. One thing you need to understand first is the difference between Photoshop and Sketch. You can start with these two articles: Sketch Vs Photoshop and Khoi Vinh on using Sketch instead of Photoshop

Also there are resources that you can read and view on Bohemian Coding’s Community page.

The best thing about Sketch is that there really is no canvas so you can just drag all the UI elements on your file and just start creating your pages/canvas within. So you can have multiple canvas while you can place your UI elements outside just waiting for you to drag them on your canvas.

The only advice that I think that will benefit you greatly while using Sketch is that you also have to stop comparing it with your Photoshop workflow. Sketch is build for UI design while Photoshop is really for photo-editing. We are technically just hacking Photoshop to work on our UI requirements. Start learning by reading the basic function on the Bohemian site and start playing with it. If you need any help you can also reach me on twitter: wiredfractal. Have a great day!

Comments
Left-handed mode please


  My left hand on a Magic Trackpad and Wacom Pen and sometimes for keyboard shortcut. My right hand for the mouse and keyboard. A new pointing device (LeapMotion) is sandwiched between my keyboard and wacom tablet. This is my designer mode on my desk.


Using Sketch App today made me realize that there are so many app that do not have a left-handed mode. You see, on Sketch App, the keyboard shortcut for zoom tool is Z key which is positioned on the left1.  I am, however, so used to Adobe’s ⌘ + spacebar shortcut keys  (can be easily accessed on left or right side of the keyboard)  that I find it very difficult to scrub zoom using Z key2.

ATTENTION DEVELOPERS:  ARE YOU EVEN THINKING ABOUT LEFTIES?

Seven  to 10% of the world population are left-handed.  If we do our math correctly, 10% of 6.91 billion people … That’s 691 million left-handed people!  Somehow, app developers have forgotten about us.  They should rethink their interface for left-handed users too.

On desktop, some lefties use their mouse with their left-hand but I trained myself to use it with my right hand just to keep up with the norms. I know that I can easily switch my mouse to my left if I wanted to since you can easily change the mouse settings and mice on the Mac is evenly shaped (with just one button) that it wouldn’t take hard for me to use it normally with my left hand. But since I added a Wacom tablet as my primary device it’s even more apparent that some of the desktop apps are not optimized for left-handed. I am thankful for keyboard shortcut customization and tool panels that I can re-arrange and tweak for my needs.  Most left-handed Wacom user prefer to have the tablet situated on their left. But I find it easier to position it on the front so it’s hard for me to use my right hand to touch the left-side of my keyboard. PopClip by Pilotmoon is one of the tools on my Mac that helps me get thru the day. PopClip is a utiliy app that  overlays an iOS style copy&paste on any app on my Mac. Some of my left-handed Wacom touting friends loved it.Normally on desktop I can live with some of the apps not having left-handed mode because of the availability of keyboard shortcuts and panels that you can move around. But on mobile most of the time it’s a world of pain.

On mobile the need for a left-handed mode is more apparent especially when using your phone with just one hand (especially with the iPhone5). Reaching out with your thumb to reach out critical buttons that is build for right-handed people is a nuinsance sometimes. In mobile there are only a few mobile apps that I can recall that have left-handed mode. The first app I’ve seen employ this is  Ecoute App for iOS. I am one of the beta-testers of the app and seeing a left-hand mode for the first time my initial thought was “Do I need to enable this? I am already used to apps that are designed for right-handed that enabling this won’t change a thing.” Now it’s the default mode of the app for me, I could no longer go back to the normal mode ever since I enabled the left-hand mode. The play button is now easier to reach and the controls are optimized for my left thumb.

The iPhone 5 taller screen makes it much more apparent that we need a left-hand mode. Think about it left-handed peeps. Tweetbot with left-hand mode, we don’t need to extend our left thumb on the upper portion of the app or worse use our right hand just to click compose button. Be able to easily click the Stream button on Instacast. Compose button on Day One on the left. So on and so forth. How it would make all lefties life so much easy just by switching the most commonly used button on the left.

Out of the 250+ apps that I have on all my device, only Ecoute is the only app that I know that has a left-handed mode. I wish there are more. If Apple would also consider a system wide option for left-handed on accessibility I would love it but right now I don’t think that it’s a possible inclusion in newly announced update to iOS. What I would love is if developers would also start considering placing a left-hand mode on their app. I’d love to hear some more apps that has left-handed mode, I know there are already existing apps that has it. But right now, most of the apps I have don’t have it. And it is a lot.

And to all lefties out there, Happy Left Hander’s Day!



they are currently working on keyboard customization to address this. ↩



⌘+spacebar is by default a spotlight shortcut on the Mac. But on Adobe software its the default for scrub zoom tool. ↩

Left-handed mode please

My left hand on a Magic Trackpad and Wacom Pen and sometimes for keyboard shortcut. My right hand for the mouse and keyboard. A new pointing device (LeapMotion) is sandwiched between my keyboard and wacom tablet. This is my designer mode on my desk.

Using Sketch App today made me realize that there are so many app that do not have a left-handed mode. You see, on Sketch App, the keyboard shortcut for zoom tool is Z key which is positioned on the left1. I am, however, so used to Adobe’s ⌘ + spacebar shortcut keys (can be easily accessed on left or right side of the keyboard) that I find it very difficult to scrub zoom using Z key2.

ATTENTION DEVELOPERS: ARE YOU EVEN THINKING ABOUT LEFTIES?

Seven to 10% of the world population are left-handed. If we do our math correctly, 10% of 6.91 billion people … That’s 691 million left-handed people! Somehow, app developers have forgotten about us. They should rethink their interface for left-handed users too.

On desktop, some lefties use their mouse with their left-hand but I trained myself to use it with my right hand just to keep up with the norms. I know that I can easily switch my mouse to my left if I wanted to since you can easily change the mouse settings and mice on the Mac is evenly shaped (with just one button) that it wouldn’t take hard for me to use it normally with my left hand. But since I added a Wacom tablet as my primary device it’s even more apparent that some of the desktop apps are not optimized for left-handed. I am thankful for keyboard shortcut customization and tool panels that I can re-arrange and tweak for my needs. Most left-handed Wacom user prefer to have the tablet situated on their left. But I find it easier to position it on the front so it’s hard for me to use my right hand to touch the left-side of my keyboard. PopClip by Pilotmoon is one of the tools on my Mac that helps me get thru the day. PopClip is a utiliy app that overlays an iOS style copy&paste on any app on my Mac. Some of my left-handed Wacom touting friends loved it.Normally on desktop I can live with some of the apps not having left-handed mode because of the availability of keyboard shortcuts and panels that you can move around. But on mobile most of the time it’s a world of pain.

On mobile the need for a left-handed mode is more apparent especially when using your phone with just one hand (especially with the iPhone5). Reaching out with your thumb to reach out critical buttons that is build for right-handed people is a nuinsance sometimes. In mobile there are only a few mobile apps that I can recall that have left-handed mode. The first app I’ve seen employ this is Ecoute App for iOS. I am one of the beta-testers of the app and seeing a left-hand mode for the first time my initial thought was “Do I need to enable this? I am already used to apps that are designed for right-handed that enabling this won’t change a thing.” Now it’s the default mode of the app for me, I could no longer go back to the normal mode ever since I enabled the left-hand mode. The play button is now easier to reach and the controls are optimized for my left thumb.

The iPhone 5 taller screen makes it much more apparent that we need a left-hand mode. Think about it left-handed peeps. Tweetbot with left-hand mode, we don’t need to extend our left thumb on the upper portion of the app or worse use our right hand just to click compose button. Be able to easily click the Stream button on Instacast. Compose button on Day One on the left. So on and so forth. How it would make all lefties life so much easy just by switching the most commonly used button on the left.

Out of the 250+ apps that I have on all my device, only Ecoute is the only app that I know that has a left-handed mode. I wish there are more. If Apple would also consider a system wide option for left-handed on accessibility I would love it but right now I don’t think that it’s a possible inclusion in newly announced update to iOS. What I would love is if developers would also start considering placing a left-hand mode on their app. I’d love to hear some more apps that has left-handed mode, I know there are already existing apps that has it. But right now, most of the apps I have don’t have it. And it is a lot.

And to all lefties out there, Happy Left Hander’s Day!


  1. they are currently working on keyboard customization to address this. 

  2. ⌘+spacebar is by default a spotlight shortcut on the Mac. But on Adobe software its the default for scrub zoom tool. 

Comments
I created a new artwork on Sketch app to show what the app can do besides User Interface design. Creating complex/abstract illustration is super easy on Sketch App. To see how the artwork was made you can download the file below to familiarize your self with what you can do with Sketch app.

Download here

I created a new artwork on Sketch app to show what the app can do besides User Interface design. Creating complex/abstract illustration is super easy on Sketch App. To see how the artwork was made you can download the file below to familiarize your self with what you can do with Sketch app.

Download here

Comments
Three new vinyls this week! @sigurros Kveikur, Vampire Weekend’s Modern Vampires of the City & Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures. Thanks @satchmiteam

Three new vinyls this week! @sigurros Kveikur, Vampire Weekend’s Modern Vampires of the City & Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures. Thanks @satchmiteam

Comments
It’s not uncommon for designers to confuse a beautiful looking product with one that works beautifully.
Comments